Some reasonable adjustments ideas for working with endometriosis

I wish I worked here.

Being able to work is a huge part of how I am able to manage living with the pain caused by endometriosis. This sounds counter intuitive, as working with a long term illness is extremely difficult, but it’s true. Working does make things easier for me in the long run.

Employment is a huge privilege that we don’t really appreciate until our ability to work comes into question. Working gives us liberty, independence and financial freedom. Now more than ever (as living with an long term illness on disability benefits is even harder in this current climate of austerity).

Most of the people I know who are ill desperately want to work or continue working. Continuing to work despite illness has helped me manage with pain, help me support myself and maintained my confidence and contact with the outside world. Illness is isolating and work helps reduce this isolation by honing your (still brilliant) mind on your job.

If you’re finding work hard with a long term illness or disability, under UK equality law you may be able to request reasonable adjustments from your employer. Laws differ from country to country but it’s mostly the case elsewhere too.

If you’re aware of this, but struggling for ideas for the sorts of things to ask your employer for, or if your employer wants to help but you’re not sure what to suggest, I’ll share some of the ideas that I have used or have helped me.

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How to manage having too much to do (with chronic pain)

The differences between chronic and acute illness

On any given day I always have too much to do. There are more things to accomplish than I have hours of the day.

This was a problem for me before I got sick, but well people aren’t always forgiving about illness, but doubly so when they want work from you or expect you to meet certain commitments. People get stressed themselves and their expectations and demands grow. Basically people forget you’re ill and expect you to do as much as everyone else.

Being busy with a chronic illness is a nightmare. You have half (or less than) the energy of other people. You’re in pain all the time and you have to manage everything that life requires.

There’s no perfect solution to being busy and stressed, but the being busy while ill part? I might be able to help a little.

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Preparing for your laparoscopy checklist

This is roughly where your four incisions will be.

I know many of you found my preparing for your endometriosis laparoscopy update useful, so I thought I’d create a checklist that you can print out and take to around with you to make sure that you’ve gotten everything covered.

As I think of more things I’ll update this document so please share this page to anyone that you think may benefit from it.

You can download the checklist here.

Hope you have a happy surgery.

 

 

If we’re not happy, we have to change things

Meeting Ed Miliband

As some of you may know I met Ed Miliband last week. He came into my workplace (which was entirely unexpected) and I got the opportunity to ask him some questions about what the Labour party’s plans were for people with chronic illnesses.

He seems like a nice man, and he was engaging and polite, but the opportunity to talk to one of the UK’s top politicians got me thinking more broadly. I started to dwell on the individual responsbility that each of us have to encourage those in power to help us.

I’ve personally lost count of the number of people who want their healthcare increased, or want some improvement in how they see their GP or specialist, want shorter waiting times, or more regular support for their illness but also want someone else to sort this out for them.

I’ve talked in the past about how the main way I’ve managed my pain using self care and pain management, well I think we should use the same principles to change how we want our illnesses to be managed and perceived by wider society.

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The importance of keeping a pain diary

My endometriosis pain in December 2014.

The New Year is a great time to get into the habit of keeping a pain diary.

It’s sometimes very hard to talk about pain, and people don’t always want to listen. However pain diaries are great because they make your pain very visible to people that have no idea how much pain you’re in. Since we have invisible chronic illnesses any way you can make your pain more prominent to others is a good thing.

It’s not just an box ticking exercise for your doctor. Pain diaries are a huge part of the reason I am able to manage with pain. I log the pain, and then I can relax and move on.

Plus I’m convinced the only reason I got my third laparoscopy this year because I was able to show my (year long) pain diary to my consultant. He saw how progressed and extensive my pain was and agreed to operate on me. No ifs no buts.

Pain diaries don’t take ages to put together, and once you get into the habit you’ll realise the benefits. The biggest of which is your own self compiled evidence on your pain experience that is very hard for others to deny.

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Endometriosis pain relief after a hysterectomy

Have you always wondered what your endometriosis pain will be like in the future? I have too. I’ve been trying to seek out women who are further along their endometriosis journey to find out how their pain has improved, changed, worsened or vanished completely.

I’m starting off with the story of a 40-year-old woman who has had a hysterectomy for endometriosis pain. I hope you’ll find her insight helpful.

Please help

I’m looking to interview women who have experienced pain relief following the natural menopause, if you’d like to share your experience (anonymously) on my website please get in touch by leaving a comment. Your email address will only be visible to me and I’ll get in touch with you privately.

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How to prepare for your endometriosis laparoscopy

I am not afraid, I was born to do this.

I’m expecting to go in for my third laparoscopy in the next few days. I know how scary the prospect of having a laparoscopy for endometriosis can be, so I thought since I’m about to go through the process again I’d share some of the knowledge that has helped me manage in the past.

This is just my personal experience, your experience with your hospital could be slightly different. Unfortunately there’s a real inconsistency with the information you can receive prior to this operation. So here’s what I’d recommend you do before and after your laparoscopy.

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Endometriosis UK information day report 2014

A plushy womb

Last Saturday I attended the yearly information day about endometriosis hosted by Endometriosis UK. The information day was an opportunity to learn more about the latest developments in endometriosis trearment and find out the latest advice from endometriosis consultants and patients.

As ever it was a neat opportunity to meet and talk to lots of other women with endometriosis. This event couldn’t have happened without Endometriosis UK, so if you were enable to come to this event, please consider coming along next year or supporting the charity through donation or membership.

Please note

I’ve written up an account of the day as completely as I can, just as I did for the 2013 information day and the 2012 information day. Naturally it doesn’t compare to actually being there.

I’ve had to paraphrase some of what the speakers said (I couldn’t always hear everything), so what is written here does not represent the views of the speakers or Endometriosis UK. I apologise for any inadvertent mistakes.

Always discuss any changes to your treatment plans with your doctor and consultant as they know the best treatment for your personal circumstances.

With that in mind, here’s what we learnt on the day.

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An interview on my experience of endometriosis diagnosis & treatment

My study area.

I was recently approached by a Journalist called Stela Todorovic who wanted to write a piece about endometriosis. I look forward to the piece, but I thought in the meantime you all might benefit from the answers I gave about what my diagnosis was like and the experience of being treated in the UK.

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I’m attending the Endometriosis UK information day 2014

My business card with contact details :)

Hi everyone,

Just a quick update to let you know that I’ll be attending this years Endometriosis information day in London. I’ll be doing my best to to write up a summary of the information discussed there as I did in 2012 and 2013.

It would be great to see some of you while I am there, so if you have visited my website (and found it helpful) or would like me to write something in particular for you come say hi.

These information days are crucial for finding out the latest treatment information about the treatment and care of endometriosis, and for meeting other women with this illness.

I’m a member of Endometriosis UK, and this yearly information day is run by them so if you can’t make it this year, I really recommend supporting them through membership, or looking at the other ways you can support this amazing charity.

Watch this space for this years information day update, and thanks to Endometriosis UK for hosting such a fantastic support day.

Endohope

My name is Michelle and I've been living and working with endometriosis for five years. I hope to provide some hope for this illness through practical advice and discussion of this awful disease.

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